Welcome to the News & Reviews section here at Doctor Who Online! This is where you will find all the latest Doctor Who related news and reviews split up into easy to use sections - each section is colour coded for your convenience. The latest items can be found at the top, and older items follow down the page.

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27 February 2018


Publisher: BBC Books

Written By: Douglas Adams & James Goss

RRP: £16.99 (Hardback)

Release Date: 18th January 2018

Reviewed by: Richard Binnington


Rediscover the lost Doctor Who adventure by Douglas Adams. 

Intergalactic war? That’s just not cricket … or is it? 

The Doctor promised Romana the end of the universe, so she’s less than impressed when what she gets is a cricket match. But then the award ceremony is interrupted by eleven figures in white uniforms and peaked skull helmets, wielding bat-shaped weapons that fire lethal bolts of light into the screaming crowd. The Krikkitmen are back. 

Millions of years ago, the people of Krikkit learned they were not alone in the universe, and promptly launched a xenophobic crusade to wipe out all other life-forms. After a long and bloody conflict, the Time Lords imprisoned Krikkit within an envelope of Slow Time, a prison that could only be opened with the Wicket Gate key, a device that resembles – to human eyes, at least – an oversized set of cricket stumps…

From Earth to Gallifrey, from Bethselamin to Devalin, from Krikkit to Mareeve II to the far edge of infinity, the Doctor and Romana are tugged into a pan-galactic conga with fate as they rush to stop the Krikkitmen gaining all five pieces of the key. If they fail, the entire cosmos faces a fiery retribution that will leave nothing but ashes…

Romana thought she was having a bad day when The Doctor decided to take her to the cricket. But that was nothing when the most deadly robots in the universe turned up. The Doctor and Romana romp around the universe racing to collect all the pieces of the Wicket Gate key in order to stop the Krikkitmen freeing their home planet, Krikkit, enveloped in a slow time field by the Time Lords, after a devastating conflict. The entire universe is at stake, with the Krikkitmen aiming to destroy everything and everyone as they step up to the bat. Oh and did I mention the most incredibly dangerous weapon in the universe is rolling around looking very much like a Cricket ball from planet earth? With Time Lords, Tea and ‘regrettable acts between the swimming pool and the car park’, this adventure in time and space is magnificently crafted, which will no doubt fill you to the brim on a nostalgia hype.

The most tantalising part of the book is how evident the voice of the writer's is. I found it seamlessly Douglas Adams but with James Goss’ exceptional skill to tell the story through a combined humour and wit which permeates throughout. Whether it is detailing the quiet hobbies of Time Lords back on Gallifrey (including their favourite, ever-loving quest for a lovely cup of tea) or The Doctor checking if he's talking to the right K9 and not the one he left with Leela, who is running about on the planet somewhere.

Doctor Who And The Krikkitmen is a fantastic celebration of one of the best writers Doctor Who has ever had, and has brought his spirit back to life. It’s rooted full of mythology from the history of the series, which makes it even more enjoyable - particularly, The Doctor spending a large amount of time back in The Matrix.

Unusually, this book had its own set of ‘Special Features’ just like what we’re used to from the brilliant DVD range. Goss details how ‘The Krikkitmen’ came to be, alongside the original 32 page treatment written by Adams, which contains a version of the story with a different companion, Sarah Jane! Originally cited as ‘Jane’ within the treatment, Goss tried out a version with her and discovered that it would make more sense for Romana, as played by Lalla Ward, to feature, due to its connections with Shada. It includes these first few chapters, which is immensely interesting to see how much changed by swapping out the companion.

Overall, it's a fantastic romp in the style of, what some consider, the best era of Doctor Who. A thoroughly enjoyable read, full of attention to detail, and, quite simply, a lost classic on screen. On finishing, it left me wanting more and I immediately popped City of Death in my DVD player for a seamless experience. This addition to the range of Fourth Doctor novelisations (Shada By Gareth Roberts, City Of Death by James Goss, & The Pirate Planet by James Goss) continues to delve into the details of how magical a writer Douglas Adams was. Even the chapter titles have humorous elements to them, my favourite: Chapter 42: The Meaning of Life. If you’re in need of a new Fourth Doctor fix, get out there and read this now!



+  Doctor Who And The Krikkitmen is Out Now, priced £16.99.
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23 February 2018


Publisher: BBC Books

Written By: Cavan Scott, Jacqueline Rayner, Paul Magrs, James Goss, Peter Anghelides & Richard Dinnick

RRP: £9.99 (Hardback)

Release Date: 22nd February 2018

Reviewed by: Richard Binnington


Know your frenemy.

‘I’ve had adventures too. My whole life doesn’t revolve around you, you know.’

When she's not busy amassing armies of Cybermen, or manipulating the Doctor and his companions, Missy has plenty of time to kill (literally). In this all new collection of stories about the renegade Time Lord we all love to hate, you'll discover just some of the mad and malevolent activities Missy gets up to while she isn't distracted by the Doctor.

So please try to keep up.

Since her first appearance in the series, Missy has become one of the most anticipated and well loved characters from the Capaldi era. Piggybacking from friend to foe for The Doctor, you never know what to expect with her, and with these short stories, it continues to build that wonder. The Missy Chronicles combines a plethora of writing talent to give us more on her backstory and how she came to be the master, reborn.

This book consists of 6 short, but thrilling stories which open up the doors to various off-screen adventures. Set in the past, present and future, you don't know what to expect next from the loveable rogue. There's even the return of the Tissue Compression Eliminator in a couple of the stories, which I loved immensely.
 

Dismemberment By James Goss is a look into the psyche of Missy and how you should not cross her, or maybe you won't make it home in time for tea.
 

Lords and Masters By Cavan Scott is a wonderful parallel to say, The Key To Time, in which The Timelords have sent Missy out on a mission, much like The Doctor, but will she stick to the task, or does she have a more ruthless plan up her sleeve.
 

Teddy Sparkles Must Die! By Paul Magrs has Missy in place as a nanny to a set of children in the early 20’s. Seemingly looking out for the children, something more mysterious is in play and it involves a magical bear called Teddy Sparkles. Absolutely mad but superb.
 

The Liar, The Glitch And The Warzone By Peter Anghelides is a wonderfully written adventure featuring Missy trapped between two timezones and shows what lengths she is willing to go to in order to survive. This short really left me wanting more.
 

Girl Power! By Jacqueline Raynor is a perfect example of why we need more by Raynor in the Doctor Who Universe. Written from the perspective of Missy using the internet, this is the most experimental short story of the collection and is full of charm. If you have ever wondered what Missy, Jane Austen, Agatha Christie and Boudica in a online chat room would be like, wonder no more.
 

Alit In Underland By Richard Dinnick, was my favourite of all the stories. It returns to the events of World Enough And Time and follows Missy and The Master out on a reconnaissance task. I love the dialogue between these two and would happily read a mini-series based on the pair, alone.
 

This whole book is a triumph to the character and shows a clear example how characters from within the Doctor Who universe can stand on their own two feet. I would really enjoy getting some more off screen adventures of Missy / The Master in book form - hours of entertainment! Missy’s voice and mannerisms have been captured perfectly by all 6 writers who have grasped this complex character so easily.
 

A highly recommended read for anyone who loves the new series stories and could do with a little burst of evil in their life, every now and then. The Missy Chronicles is released just in time for International Women’s Day, so grab your copy as soon as you can. Make sure you “ say something nice…”



+  The Missy Chronicles is Out Now, priced £9.99.
+  PURCHASE this title on Amazon.co.uk!
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.


 

8 February 2018


Publisher: BBC Books

Written By: Cavan Scott & Mark Wright

RRP: £14.99 (Paperback)

Release Date: 11th January 2018

Reviewed by: Richard Binnington


Test your knowledge of the last Time Lord and the worlds he’s visited in Who-ology, an unforgettable journey through over 50 years of Doctor Who.

Packed with facts, figures and stories from the show’s galactic run, this unique tour of space and time takes you from Totters Lane to Heaven itself, taking in guides to UNIT call signs, details of the inner workings of sonic screwdrivers, and a reliability chart covering every element of the TARDIS. 

Now fully updated to cover everything through to the 12th Doctor's final episode, and with tables, charts and illustrations dotted throughout, as well as fascinating lists and exhaustive detail, you won’t believe the wonders that await.

As Doctor Who fans, it's a fact that we spend 77% of our lives rewatching episodes of our favourite Time Lord. Well, actually, you’ve got me there - that’s a false fact. But this brand new, updated edition of WHO-OLOGY- The Official Miscellany is bursting with well-researched, fun and interesting facts, you may never have even thought of; I mean, it would be rude not to have it in your collection.

The book itself is broken up into eight main sections:

The 55 Year Diary: A Doctor Who Timeline. These 24 pages delve into key dates of the shows history, summarising it in short, interesting passages. It’s amazing to see how much really has happened in the past 55 years, a favourite of mine: 21 March 1970, The theme tune ‘sting’ to emphasise the cliffhanger ending to each episode is used for the first time at the suggestion of Michael Ferguson.

Everyone’s Favourite Timelord: The Many Lives and Changing Faces of The Doctor. Filled with Biographies of the actors to play The Doctor, our heroes height and even a collection of all the alternative names used throughout time - (There's 75, I counted!).

The Doctor’s Best Friends: Companions & Other Allies. With the actors birthdays, reasons for leaving The Doctor and a multitude of sections devoted to UNIT. For me, the section of this chapter that stands out the most is The Lives and Times of Nicholas Courtney. Similar to the 55 year diary, this details all the Doctor Who related events to our beloved Brigadier, who is still very much missed.

A Carnival Of Monsters. Have you ever wanted an A-Z of The Daleks? A Sontaran Roll Call? Or Even a list of familiar voices that helped to make the plethora of monsters send a chill down your spine? Well this part of the book is fantastic and dives into the history of, what I think, makes the show so special.

Lots of planets have a north: A rough guide to Earth and other worlds. How many countries has The Doctor actually visited on Earth? A wonderful infographic provides us with the answer of 32, but you will have to get the book to find out where. The detailed list of Planets attacked by The Daleks is brilliantly researched, there's 4 pages of them, who would have thought?!

A Kettle and a piece of string: Technology in Doctor Who. Whether you’re looking for 14 facts about the Whomobile or how many different things the Sonic Screwdriver has been used for, this section of the book has it. Scrambling Scribble Monsters, an essential reason of why we need the Sonic Screwdriver in the real world!

Relative Dimensions: Doctor Who & Pop Culture. Outside of the fandom, our beloved show has attracted a lot of attention and become a cult icon. This section delves into music, TV and connections to famous books such as The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy. A key section for random knowledge you can dispel at dinner parties.

And last but not least, The Matrix: Behind The Scenes. Ever wondered what stories name check themselves in the episode? Or how about a list of the most prolific directors in the show? A fun informative section that is a great addition to have all in one handy place.

Cavan Scott & Mark Wright have provided us with this wonderful series bible, full of fun facts and key moments in Doctor Who history. This book is the ultimate gift for any Doctor Who fan. Full to the brim of 55 years of information on our favourite Time Lord, organised perfectly into 355 pages. The ultimate guide to study before attending a Doctor Who Pub Quiz, ooh would you look at that, that timed nicely, I’m off to one tonight.

A real treat and a joy to see the 13th Doctor joining the historical line up. The beauty of this official miscellany is that it caters to all fans, whether you're an Eccleston-er, a Baker Boy or even a member of the Colin Club - each Doctor gets their fair share at the bat.



+  Who-ology - The Official Miscellany: Regenerated Edition is Out Now.
+  Buy this book from Amazon.co.uk for just £10.53!
+  Follow Cavan Scott (@CavanScott) on Twitter.
+  Follow Mark Wright (@MWrightWriter) on Twitter
+  Follow Doctor Who Online (@DrWhoOnline) on Twitter
.


 

5 February 2018

Publisher: Independently Published

Written By: Marc W. Johnson

RRP: £9.95 (Paperback) / £9.99 (Kindle) / $12.99 (Paperback) / $7.99 (Kindle)

Release Date: 14th October 2017

Reviewed by: Richard Binnington

Review Posted: 5th February 2018

Legacy follows the story of Rebecca ‘Rose’ Healy, whose life seems to all be falling perfectly into place. But little does she know it's about to take an incredibly dark, life-changing turn. When a secret is unearthed from deep within her family, she must take up the reigns left behind by her late father, who was killed in a vicious attack by a werewolf in front of her very eyes. Rose does not know who she can trust; rumours of a spy within the group of hunters kick her into action to track the traitor that has slowly destroyed her perfect little life. The book finished with an intense confrontation, that the less said of it, the better the ending.

This story really doesn't hold back in any department and is most definitely not for children. With tonnes of extreme violence, this gruesome tale deals its audience a very descriptive experience that puts a fantastic, adult twist onto a classic cult fairytale. Within the first chapter, its straight in with the blood, guts and gore - lovely!

The underlying tale comes across as a thoroughly enjoyable modern day retelling of Little Red Riding Hood. It’s an emotional rollercoaster from start to finish, pushing Rose to her limit, and for the audience, a real struggle to put down. This is the sort of book you would read by candlelight on a cold winter's night accompanied by a pot of tea - the ideal setting of course, but it also translates to being very readable on the morning tube, taking its reader into the world of the supernatural.

This is the second publication from Johnson, the first being a collection of dark short stories and poetry. But this first fiction feature is a triumph in incredibly visual storytelling. Each description detailed to give the audience a truly vivid image of the vicious scenes in question. One of the most engaging parts of this story is how it constantly throws twists and turns, leaving you to ponder for more. I found it an intense read and it left me squirming and, quiet literally, has the hairs on the back of my neck spiking up on several occasions; what a brilliant experience!

Legacy is a chilling and thrilling read which is sure to make you cringe in horror as the story unfolds. I highly recommend it for a multitude of audiences. Whether you enjoy a good old horror story or if you’re a fan of the more fantastical, this book will cater to your thrill-seeking needs.

I look forward to seeing more work emerge from Marc W. Johnson and I can only hope it is as exciting as this read. This review has been tough to write as I really don’t want to spoil the story for anyone. Just pick it up, get reading and get enthralled by it!

 

+  Legacy is Out Now.
+  Buy this book from Amazon.co.uk & Amazon.com!
+  Follow Marc W. Johnson on Twitter.

2 February 2018

Publisher: MyIdentifiers.com

Written By: Gary C. Mele Jr

RRP: £7.64 (Paperback) / $9.99 (Paperback) / $1.38 (Kindle)

Release Date: 10th October 2017

Reviewed by: Richard Binnington

Review Posted: 2nd February 2018

Leadership, Heaven and hell; a Cybersentient hero is the story of how the human race must go to the most extreme methods in order to survive. The Earth, our home, has ceased to revolve causing half the planet to plunge into a devoid new ice age, with the other to burn in the scorching heat of the sun. Refugees of our planet stream out into the safety of the great unknown, space.

After 20 years, resources are depleting and a method is required to survive without the requirements of a human body, an upgrade. This is the story of Samuel, and his cousin Eve, as he approaches his segue into a Cybersentient, the next step for the human race. The process is not simple or safe and not everyone makes it through. The threat of being hijacked by ‘demons’ in the middle of the process is very high and a risk which they have lost many inhabitants too. With leader Byallanon seemingly up to something, anarchy begins to develop within the ranks and something must be done to stop the destruction of the Cybersentient race.

One of the most persistent themes within the book is that of the importance of family and the bond it holds. This story is driven by the relationship between Samuel and Eve and their closeness really ties the story together. The picturesque descriptions of the Cybersentients and their individual designs are incredibly vivid and provide a strong image for yourself whilst reading. Samuel’s journey shows him progress from an angst-filled young man to a confident individual, ready to take a stand. Eve’s charm and wit is a strong presence within creating a duo of characters in which you want to follow their adventure.

The first published book from Gary C.Mele Jr give us an insight to the human condition and what we are prepared to do for future generations to survive. With aspects feeling like a mirror being turned on ourselves, Mele has crafted a story that really engages the audience to think about what we are doing to our planet and what could inevitably come next. Mele has drawn on many current events and has called this “My Sci-Fi answer to Trump.” The tone of the story reminded me of so many various franchises rolled into one creating an exciting read. So if you’re interested in a story with the essence of Doctor Who / Pacific Rim / Star Trek / Transformers, this is the book for you.

This book flowed wonderfully and the pages flew past. Without realising, I was 330 pages in and it was sadly over. With a sequel in the works, this is a must read for any sci-fi fan especially at the bargain price of 99p on Amazon Kindle.
 

 

+  Leadership, Heaven And Hell is Out Now.
+  Buy this book from Amazon.co.uk & Amazon.com!
+  Follow Gary C. Mele Jr on Twitter.

9 June 2017

Publisher: Amberley Books

Written By: Paul Berry

RRP: £14.99 (Paperback)

Release Date: May 2017

Reviewed by: Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 9th June 2017

Part of being a Doctor Who fan is about collecting the merchandise associated with our favourite show; be it an action figure, a DVD, a CD, or a rare collectors piece. During the show’s rich 50+ year history, Doctor Who has created more pieces of merchandise than any other British TV programme, and the new ‘Doctor Who Memorabilia’ book by Paul Berry chronicles a surprising amount of it!

Since the show returned to our screens in 2005, the floodgates opened to a whole new wave of merchandise, but for this particular book, Berry has wisely focused on the classic series and everything right up to the 2005 series.

Split up into easy to navigate chapters, Berry kicks off with the various Doctor Who books that have been released over the years - as far back as 1964 with ‘The Dalek Book’ and as far ahed to the BBC Eighth Doctor and Past Doctor novels. It’s worth noting at this point how vibrant the pictures are (full colour of course), and it’s so good to come across a piece of merchandise that jogs a memory from your youth. Who could forget the Target books, or the annuals, and not forgetting The Doctor Who Monster Book!

Chapter 2 covers the Toys, Models and Games released over the years - some of which are now incredibly valuable. The Cowan De Groot Daleks, Jigsaws, Dapol action figures and Big Chief statues all get a look-in. There’s also room for the classic series merchandise released in recent years from Character Options.

Perhaps our favourite section is Chapter 3, which covers the Audio Visual releases. Who could forget travelling to your local WH Smith and seeing the vast selection of Doctor Who videos for sale, complete with all the stunning cover art by Alister PearsonAndrew Skilleter and Colin Howard. There’s also an area dedicated to the Doctor Who DVD releases, as the merchandise transitioned into the 21st century.

And so the book continues exploring other arms of the merchandising tree, including Comics, Magazines, Audiobooks & CDs, Cards and Collector pieces. Each area makes room for poignant pieces as well as harder to find and more unknown items. Even the most devoted of fans will find something they didn’t know about, here.

Berry has clearly done his homework, and as well as introducing and presenting the various pieces, there are some great nuggets of information and facts along the way, too. One example being the fact that prior to the laserdisc rage being cancelled, artwork was produced for ’Spearhead from Space’, but sadly the title, and the artwork were never released.

Although a relatively slimline book, sitting at just under 100 pages, it’s surprising just how much is packed into it! The Doctor Who Memorabilia book not only serves as a valuable guide to some of the key (and even more obscure) pieces of Doctor Who merchandise over the years, but it acts as a comforting trip down memory lane - a trip you’ll be happy to take over and over again.
 

 

+  Doctor Who Memorabilia is Out Now, priced £14.99.
+  Buy this book from Amberley Books for just £13.49!
+  Follow Amberley Books on Twitter.

18 May 2017

Publisher: Amazon Media

Written By: Andrew Hastie

RRP: £9.99 (Paperback) / £2.99 (Kindle)

Release Date: January 2015

Reviewed by: Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 12th May 2017

DWO regularly receives a wide range of products to review; some Doctor Who related and some indirectly related to the Doctor Who universe. Whilst Andrew Hastie's The Infinity Engines series isn't a Doctor Who title, we couldn't help but feel that there were several strands that connected to the whoniverse, and the first book in the series 'Anachronist' is one many who fans will love and find it hard to put down.

Anachronist is the perfect blend of History and Science Fiction with intelligent plot devices, rich characters and more time travel than you can shake a stick at. In fact, this is a story that will give any Doctor Who fan that warm, Mr Kipling-esque feeling of familiarity. The first chapter even feels like a pre-titles sequence set-up that literally launches you right into the action. There's a slight feeling of John Green in Hastie's style, and at its heart (and much like a John Green title) this is a coming of age story.

The time travel element is set up pretty quickly, and without giving to much away, Josh (the main character), quickly finds himself in the past in historical Prussia in 1944. Hastie's ability to weave in actual historical elements, whilst carving out his own unique story is seamless and refreshing, and you go to so many places and points in time that the book never tires or stagnates.

Anachronist has something for everyone, and for those of you who are a sucker for a romance, Hastie has that covered for you, too! Nothing is shoe-horned in for effect, everything has its place and a meaning and the reader genuinely cares for Josh and the people he meets along the way.

The book ends on a cliffhanger, and you will be climbing the walls desperate for a resolution. We just wish we could time travel into the future to read it!

 

+  Anachronist: A Time Travel Adventure is Out Now, priced £9.99 / $12.99.
+  Buy this book on Amazon!
+  Follow Infinity Engines on Twitter.

22 February 2016

Publisher: BBC Books

Written By: Mark Clapham

RRP: £4.99

Release Date: 4th February 2002

Reviewed by: Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 23rd February 2016

Hope is a novel on BBC books, and it features the Eighth Doctor, Paul McGann, and the characters Fitz, and Anji, and is a story about The Doctor unravelling a local political intrigue.

The novel, which is the bases of a Dr Who episode, was first published in 2002, written by Mark Clapham. The story begins with The Doctor trying to push the TARDIS to its limit, when the crew finding themselves on an inhospitable planet, due to the TARDIS breaking up, and it lands on a frozen sea of acid on the planet Endpoint, in the distant future. As the ice begins to break they flee to the nearest city of hope, only to see the TARDIS sink to the bottom of the sea. In Hope a policemen, who’s investigating a decapitation, explains that the planet is toxic, so the inhabitants have had to evolve to survive, but recently a serial killer has been decapitating people.

The policeman tells them to go to the casino for help, and when they arrive The Doctor buys entry with an apple core, which is long extinct. Inside the casino a group of cyborgs calling themselves the Brotherhood of the Silver Fist, burst in and demand that the casino’s owner, Silver, speaks to them. Silver, a cyborg himself, drive the brotherhood, out, but as he finds out from The Doctor that he’s a time traveller he offers to recover the TARDIS if The Doctor catches the murderer. (There are lots of uk casino games online to play, including roulette, slots, and blackjack, to get the experience of being in a real casino. Betway are offering a welcome bonus, on the first three deposits for new players, with big win jackpots to be won).

The Doctor finds a used tranquilliser dart at a crime scene, and deduces that the murders are part of a plan committed by a visitor to Endpoint, and he also learns that the inhabitants produce a hormone, which is similar to the effects of adrenaline. The Doctor is overpowered and is then held in a bunker on the sea bed, and Silver attacks the bunker and kills the humans. Whilst in the bunker The Doctor and Silver find technology capable of reversing the pollution, and when activated the sea turns into water, and the air becomes breathable again. There’s a hypertunnel in the bunker, which can be used to quickly travel throughout space, and Silver flees through the hypertunnel, which then gets reprogrammed to leave Silver and his army stranded on a dead planet.

 

+  Hope is Out Now, priced £4.99.
+  Buy this book on Amazon.co.uk

5 December 2015

Publisher: Hasslein Books

Written By: Brian J. Robb & Paul Simpson

RRP: £13.03 (UK) / $19.99

Release Date: January 2015

Reviewed by: Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 5th December 2015

Whilst we now live in a time where there are countless Doctor Who guides available to buy in our local bookshops, few have dared tackle the format in such a brave, unique and refreshing way like Brian J. Robb and Paul Simpson have. Who Beyond 50 presents us with a chronological guide to the series, laid out over 5 sections and split up into 50 individual essays. 

Right from the very first essay (Visual Vortex Meets Musical Mysteries) you are catapulted back in time to the airing of that very first episode, with Hartnell's title sequence being described in the most evocative and affectionate way. Arguably many of the topics themselves have been covered before, but there's something about Who Beyond 50 that makes you feel like youre reading them for the first time through new eyes. Where many guides simply touch on aspects, themes and areas of interest, Who Beyond 50 delves further, leaving the reader feeling like they have a fuller and more rounded picture.

As well as covering all the Doctors and their tenure on the show, Companions, Monsters, Producers and poignant moments in the shows long history are also given the spotlight. Those of you interested in the Missing Episodes saga, for example, can be assured of a well-researched and well-presented guide - taking us right up to the recent discovery of The Web Of Fear & The Enemy Of The World in 2013.

Doctor Who fandom itself also gets a look-in, and Chapter 31: When Fandom Attacks, is particularly worth a read - even including super-fan; Ian Levine's inclusion in the John Nathan-Turner era of the show in the 1980's. Oh, and that period that we have all come to know as 'The Wilderness Years' is also covered in particularly broad detail, chronicling the TV Movie, as well as the online adventures of The Doctor, and the Books and Audios that helped keep the show alive in the 1990's.

Whilst a large portion of the book is dedicated to the classic series, the new series is referenced throughout wherever there are relevant comparisons and interesting points of note. Section 5 is completely dedicated to 'New Who' charting Russell T. Davies rise and the events that lead to his appointment as show runner, right through to the revival, and detailing all the modern-era Doctors to date.

Kudos to the structuring of the book, too; it's incredibly easy to follow, and it means you don't have to read from start to finish, allowing the reader to cherry pick sections or eras of the show and its history.

We heartily recommend Who Beyond 50 - not just because of the tremendous amount of love, respect and sheer detail that has gone into the book, but because it truly deserves a place in any fans collection - a title you will be reaching for more often than you think!

 

+  Who Beyond 50 is Out Now, priced £13.03 / $19.99.
+  Buy this book on Amazon.co.uk or Amazon.com 
+  Follow Hasslein Books on Twitter.

23 September 2015

Publisher: Hachette Partworks / Panini Magazines

RRP: £1.99 (Issue 1) / £6.99 (Fortnightly)

Release Date: September 2015

Reviewed by: Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 23rd September 2015

From the team who brought you the hugely popular Doctor Who Magazine, as well as the team behind some of the most successful partworks on the market, comes a truly fantastic collectable magazine and book series called 'Doctor Who: The Complete History'.

Issue 1 hit our desk this morning, and we were immediately blown away by just how jam-packed full of information and facts the first book was. Issue 1 comes with Volume 55, which looks at five David Tennant / 10th Doctor adventures (Gridlock, Daleks In Manhattan, Evolution Of The Daleks, The Lazarus Experiment & 42).

The book series is hailed as the 'definitive guide to the making of Doctor Who' and it lives up to every letter of that tagline. There are some truly beautiful illustrations and images to be found throughout. 

In addition to the book, you get a mini pull-out magazine with Issue 1, which includes a timeline of The Doctor and a short bio on each Doctor. The magazine opens out to a gloriously huge poster of Daleks in Manhattan / Evolution Of The Daleks.

Kudos to everyone involved; particularly John Ainsworth (Editor) Lee Johnson (Story Montages) and Paul Vyse (Designer), whose combined efforts (as well as the extended team) have delivered this exciting new collection that every fan of the good Doctor should own!

 

+  SUBSCRIBE
to Doctor Who: The Complete History at:
 www.dwcompletehistory.com

29 June 2015

Publisher: Race Point Publishing

Written By: Cameron K. McEwan

RRP: £12.99 / $21.99 US / $23.99 CAD

Release Date: 7th May 2015

Reviewed by: Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 29th June 2015

Fans familiar with the Blogtor Who fan site will know that its editor, Cameron K McEwan has a penchant for lists. Lists are great, we love a good list! So when we found out that Cameron was putting together The Big Book Of Lists, we were rather excited to say the least!

First off, the title definitely lives up to its name - with over 255 pages jam-packed with facts, miscellany and trivia to test your own knowledge, you’re always going to find something new and informative about Doctor Who.

For example, we were rather surprised to find out that the first time The Doctor strangled a companion was in The Twin Dilemma! :) Ever wondered exactly how tall each of the Doctor’s were? Or how many hours of screen time each Doctor had? Or perhaps how many times the word ‘Time’ has actually appeared in a title? Needless to say, this book has answers to all those questions and many, many more.

The range of subjects, quotes and cross-referencing with other popular cult movies and TV shows is staggering, and is a testament to the sheer amount of effort and hard work, and love that has clearly gone into the book.

Look out for a special list from Doctor Who composer, Murray Gold, where he shares his memories and thoughts from seven of Blogtor Who’s favourite ‘MuGo’ scores.

As with Cameron's previous book (The Who’s Who Of Doctor Who) the content is supported by the beautiful artwork of Andrew Skilleter, and coupled with the striking pallete of colours and overall design of this title, it’s as visually appealing as it is factually.

One of our favourite illustrations is the double-page montage (p38-p39) featuring all of the Doctors in a nod to the curator scene from the 50th anniversary special; The Day Of The Doctor. There’s also a rather snazzy ‘Percentage Of the Daleks’ infographic (p81) which shows the popularity of The Daleks by Doctor.

They say good things come in three’s, so were very much looking forward to Cameron’s next offering, and if The Big Book Of Lists is anything to go by, it’s going to be a corker!

 

+  The Big Book Of Lists is Out Now, priced £12.99 / $21.99 US / $23.99 CAD.
+  Buy this book on Amazon.co.uk for just £10.39

+  Follow BlogtorWho on Twitter.
+  Follow DrWhoOnline on Twitter

7 March 2015

Publisher: Lulu.com

Written By: Darren M. Bane

RRP: £7.99

Release Date: 23rd January 2015

Reviewed by: Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 7th March 2015

Every week we get a good number of Doctor Who related goodies dropping through the letterbox here at DWO Towers, but one particular goody piqued our interest this week, and it came in the form of Darren M. Bane’s new parody book ‘Dr U Who’.

Join Darren as he attempts to bring an answer to a very important question; “What really happened to prompt the mighty BBC to finally return our hero to prime-time television”?

In doing so, a whole barrage of amusing issues are tackled including the ‘truth’ behind the Missing Episodes and why aliens speak perfect English - to name just a couple!

You’re taken on an accidental journey backwards and forwards in time, with many side trips along the way that will have you sniggering uncontrollably and tittering left, right and centre! 

Through the parody, you will be surprised at how many childhood memories of the show you’ll have jogged, in what can only be described as a lovingly crafted, gentle prodding at the show and the powers that control it.

Clearly, the title isn’t aimed at the younger fan, but anyone who has followed both the classic and new series of Doctor Who will appreciate everything that has gone into Dr U Who.

Highly recommended!

 

+  Dr U Who is Out Now, priced £7.99.
+  Buy this book on Amazon.co.uk

+  Follow DazzaBane on Twitter.
+  Follow DrWhoOnline on Twitter.

20 February 2014

Publisher: Race Point Publishing

Written By: Cameron K. McEwan

RRP: £18.99

Release Date: 9th January 2014

Reviewed by: Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 20th February 2014

Now, it’s no secret that we’re good buddies with Blogtor Who owner, Cameron K. McEwan, and when we heard he was coming out with a Doctor Who book that would act as "a whovian guide to friends, foes, villains, monsters and companions", we were very excited indeed - especially considering his vast knowledge and love for the show.

Once you finally get over adoring the beautifully embossed ‘Doctor Who’ lettering on the cover, which also features The 10th, 11th and 12th Doctors (yes that is the correct numbering), you are presented with the simple, yet effective contents page that typifies this straight-up, no-nonsense guide which does exactly what it says on the proverbial tin.

The various sections within the book (The Doctors, The Companions, Friends & Allies, Robots, Time Lords & Ladies, Villains and Aliens & Monsters) are laid out beautifully and clearly in alphabetical order to easily find who you want.

As you thumb through pages and pages of character breakdowns, coupled with pictures and illustrations gloriously brought to life by Andrew Skilleter, you realise just how concise the book is. With over 50 years to draw from you will find information about characters you have long since forgotten (Rita from The God Complex), or even facts about the ones you thought you knew everything about.

The Who's Who Of Doctor Who is essential reading for anyone wanting to know anything from 'Ace' to 'The Zygons', and with over 300 entries to explore, you’ll be reaching for it time and time again.

 

+  The Who's Who Of Doctor Who is Out Now, priced £18.99.
+  Buy this book on Amazon.co.uk for just £15.77

+  Follow BlogtorWho on Twitter.
+  Follow DrWhoOnline on Twitter

28 September 2012

Publisher: I.B. Tauris

Written By: Graham Sleight

RRP: £12.99

Release Date: 30th August 2012

Reviewed by: Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 28th September 2012

Although not an official release from the BBC, Graham Sleight's 'The Doctor's Monsters' deserves all the accolade and respect that the aforementioned corporation gets with their own titles.

The book serves as a dedicated guide to some of the monsters featured in Doctor Who, together with a glossary containing (as far as we could see) every monster ever to have appeared in the show.

It is clear from both the incredibly detailed and well-researched biographies, through to Sleight's narrative, that this is a book for fans by fans - and it is all the better for it.

Together with an introduction from Doctor Who Writer / Author; Paul Cornell, that sums up what to expect in the book perfectly, you can't help but feel just how tidy and concise 'The Doctor's Monsters' is.

Let's hope this is the beginning of what will hopefully grow to be a library of guides from Sleight and I.B. Tauris. Essential reading!

 

+  The Doctor's Monsters is available now via the I.B. Tauris, Who Watching website.

+  Follow Who Watching on Twitter.

27 January 2011

Manufacturer: BBC Children's Books

Written By: Justin Richards & Trevor Baxendale

RRP:  £6.99

Release Date: 3rd February 2011

Reviewed by: Rebecca Holbourn for Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 27th January 2011

I found the idea of a two in one book rather exciting, but you instantly face this awful dilemma of which to read first due to the fact that both have fronts. So, naturally I turned the book over several times before choosing. I was excited to find out that Rory featured in both stories but disappointed he hadn’t made it on to the cover too.

I settled down to read Heart of Stone and was not disappointed as was instantly presented with a mysterious event to which there seemed no logical and immediate reason. How does a wall fall down as though hit by a lorry that doesn’t exist and why have all the rocks turned in to moonstone? Intrigued I read on, the characters capturing me and feeling very in tune with the show. The Doctor, in his Doctory way flounced around getting under everybody’s feet with Amy and Rory desperately trying to keep up. It is quite a light plot, although it does have its darker moments. There are several parts which make you laugh out loud and a few which have you on the edge of your seat. All the way through the twists and turns keep you constantly guessing and intrigued. Everything turning to stone really makes you wonder how can everything turn back? Although occasionally, it can have a slight lack of clarity and the occasional illogical moment, it is a book which keeps you captured and despairing that normality can ever return to the village, which is just what you look for in any good plot.

Thrilled with the first half I eagerly turned the book over and started reading Death Riders. Well, with a ride called “The Death Ride”, that is just asking for trouble. Why are some tunnels out of limits? And will the death ride actually lead to death? There is a lot of suspense built up in this book and you constantly long to know what is waiting round the corner. The funfair itself is enjoyable and Rory in particular jumps off the page whilst trying to win something. I found this half to have a more comedic Doctor and it is really easy to imagine all the scenes taking place. I always find it enjoyable to make the connections at a similar pace to The Doctor as it feels like I am being lead down the path at the correct pace. It had some really wonderful characters and even made you recoil at imaginary smells. Occasionally a bit more description was needed but aside from that it was a really simple plot to follow and I look forward to rereading it in the future.

Both books are very enjoyable and make you want to keep reading till the end in one sitting. I really enjoyed both endings and they felt very satisfying and cheering. They are both very close to character and feel very believable. They are definitely books I would recommend even though they feel aimed at a younger audience then normal. There is enough depth and mystery to all so that you aren't constantly reminded that you are older.

I enjoyed the layout of the books and it was with a pang of sadness that I couldn’t turn over and find another book waiting for me to read.  Very enjoyable and I look forward to reading more in the future, as both Authors are always top class and reliably so.

 

Reviewed by: Matthew Edge for Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 27th January 2011

The only problem with this book is deciding which of the two stories to read first. The book is designed so there is no preference shown to either story. I recommend flipping it (carefully) and start with which ever is facing up, either way you won’t be disappointed.

Both stories are set after Series five and include Rory in the TARDIS crew. Both stories capture the characters of the main cast well and the dialogue fits so well I can hear the voices in my head. They don’t have a crowded TARDIS problem; both Amy and Rory have important moments in both stories. It is Rory that jumps out at me in this he has some very nice moments which fit him perfectly.

Heart of Stone is an unearthly mystery story set on a farm in England. Moon rocks are scattered around after a ‘not a lorry’ hits a wall but that is just a minor inconvenience, the bigger problem is about to walk in. The setting ties in well with Season Five, being set on a farm out yonder far from any place of interest. The characters are well built and rounded and they all add to the story with no added padding. The monster is well thought-out and is a big threat to all the characters. The short chapters help the story flow along at a fast pace. The Science is just there to move the plot along, which is all it needs to be.

All the fun of the Fair and so much more. Death Riders has its fair share of funny, strange, puzzling and musical moments all fitting together to give an enjoyable yarn. A story of dangerous tunnels, smelly old ‘men’, a funfair in an asteroid and an aptly named ride. This is a well plotted story leading up to an unpredictable climax. The only disappointment being that The Doctor doesn’t dust off his recorder.

The book is seemingly aimed at any fan of the TV show, it has something for everybody; Monsters, Aliens, Jokes and for the older fan, many references to the classic series (how many references to The Chase can you spot). It is a book that hits the heart of Doctor Who and doesn’t let you down. But putting it down and not reading it in one sitting was hard. The end of each chapter was a cliffhanger drawing you into the next page.

Overall it is a strong book and highly recommended.

 

Reviewed by: David J. Bascombe for Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 27th January 2011

Death Riders starts, as many of my favourite Doctor Who stories do, in an underground cave system. The first chapter providing what would essentially be the pre-credits sequence if this was to be adapted for an episode of the current television incarnation of the series.  That being said, whilst The Doctor, Amy and Rory are all very much of the 21st century, elements of the story, particularly the monster of the piece, and the mystery surrounding the cave system, reminded me of the 80s era of the television show. 

Once the mystery of the cave system and the mysterious deaths is revealed the story turns into a high risk adventure and a race against time. One of the benefits of Doctor Who in print form is that it is able to do things the TV series can’t do due to budget or safety limitations. I doubt that the Death Ride scene could be realised on screen as I imagined it without taking a large amount of the budget.

Whilst Death Riders is an enjoyable read that captures the characters we know well, Heart of Stone feels like it’s influenced by the show, rather than an actual part of the on-going story of the three characters.  Whilst the names are the same the characters don’t actually feel like the Doctor, Amy and Rory that I know.

In terms of the story I felt Heart of Stone to be less enjoyable than Death Riders. I found it rather difficult to care about the characters and after a while, the mystery surrounding the Rock Man.

Reading the book I was conscious of the target age range being 8-11. A good book can be enjoyed by all and the reader shouldn’t notice the author writing for a specific age range. Whilst this seemed true of Death Riders I felt that Heart of Stone was written for the younger end of the target audience.

The book is worth buying for Death Riders, as you’ll also have Heart of Stone as well, you might as well read it. You might like it after all. 

 

Reviewed by: Richard Orr for Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 30th January 2011

Death Riders

The Doctor, Amy and Rory arrive on the planet of Stanalan and walk straight into a Galactic Fair. Underneath the fun facade evil lurks in the shadows and when people start dying in mysterious circumstances the Doctor has a new mystery to solve.

Death Riders is a new story by long time Doctor Who novel writer Justin Richards and transports our heroes onto the planet as its residents await the completion of the adrenaline fuelled Death Ride.

However dark forces are at work and all is not as it may seem when Amy takes pity on a man and his furry friend.  Before long the whole universe is in danger as a long buried secret waits to be released.

The story itself starts off slow and calm, much like the Death Ride, and then begins to pick up pace as it hurtles with breakneck speed to a fantastic conclusion.

The characters are well written and the story feels epic in scale owing to the amount of people the Doctor, Amy and Rory come into contact over the course of the book as well as the sheer length of time it takes for the Death Ride to reach from one side of the planet to the other.  This is a fantastic story that will grip the reader from beginning to end.

Heart of Stone

A quiet farm in the middle of nowhere. Sounds normal doesn’t it? Well all is not as it seems especially when night falls and stone comes to life.

Heart of Stone is the latest story from Doctor Who novelist Trevor Baxendale and drops the Doctor, Amy and Rory into what looks like a normal quiet farm. Upon arrival it becomes obvious that all is not what it seems especially when pieces of moon rock are found among the rubble of a destroyed wall.

So begins a story of death and destruction which takes the reader to the moon and back. The writer gets the characters of the Doctor, Amy and Rory spot on and the supporting cast are equally well written, so much so that you really feel for them during some rather traumatic events throughout this half of the book and like Death Riders before it feels like an old school Doctor Who television story.

In contrast to Death Riders this story feels a lot smaller in scale with only 7 main characters in play during the course of the adventure. Not that this is a bad thing.

My one problem with the story was that the writer felt the need to introduce the Doctor, Amy, Rory and the TARDIS like we didn’t already know who or what they are but as it takes up so little time in the book itself and the story is so good I shall forgive this.

Reviewed by: Emma Dudley for Doctor Who Online

Review Posted: 30th January 2011

The new style of Doctor Who books (2 in 1) is an ingenious idea, as the Doctor would say - especially as when you finish one book and you're left craving just a little bit more, you can just turn it over and there's another book! The covers themselves are wonderful illustrations of the monsters contained within each of the books. Flipping over from to the other is a great advantage and each title attracts you to look inside. However there is one slight problem in choosing which book to read first! Do I go for the Death Riders with the luring line of "It's not all fun at the Galactic Fair," or Heart of Stone and its "A single touch could turn you to stone forever," which sounds quite frankly, terrifying.

I made the tough decision of reading Death Riders by Justin Richards first. The initial chapter pulls you in just like a rollercoaster, (awful pun there, I apologise) and you are left wondering what has happened. Richard's has written the three characters perfectly, particularly the Doctor's randomness that he has and his urges to lick rocks. As well as Amy's persistence, the Doctor is always late. The talk of 'off limits' rings alarm bells and the Doctor does his usual raggedy investigating. Three new characters come to light in this adventure: Perpetual Pete, Gravo the musician and his "animal" Drexxon. 

There are many twists in the story and life for the humans within the meteorite they call home has its own danger they are unaware of. A hidden history threatens to bring home to both the Doctor, Amy, Rory and the human community. You'll have to read the nail biting conclusion yourself to find out about Drexxon and if the Doctor and his friends do indeed save the day. 

Heart of Stone by Trevor Baxendale is the next Doctor Who adventure, literally a page away. A mysterious beginning yanks you into the pages - is it a meteorite? An aeroplane? An alien? You'll soon find out. The TARDIS landing in a pigsty is amusing and our three regulars reveal themselves to two new ones, a farmer and his daughter and not forgetting Percy the pregnant pig. The Doctor jumps right into the heart of the matter and just as night falls a creature returns to wreck havoc. A farmhouse is destroyed and lovers separated. The moon involves itself and Rory even gets a trip there; one small step for Rory etc. 

The fast paced adventure goes on and you wonder how the Doctor and his friends will save the Earth. In the only way he knows how, the Doctor confuses everyone with his technobabble. A jaunt to a laboratory shows hidden a secret of an experiment gone wrong. The farmer becomes one of the enemy and the technobabble becomes out of control. You will have to read on yourself to see how Heart of Stone ends. 

Both books are fantatatic reads and being able to read 2 in 1 is just a great advantage. They read just like an episode would and the characters are described wonderfully. The separate adventures with their own twists and turns. I can't wait to get my hands on more adventures. 

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